Ukulele Workshops

Schedule | 2018
Motown or Bust Tour
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Instr. Music Center
Tucson, Arizona March 4
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Las Cruces Ukes
Las Cruces, New Mexico March 8
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Ukulele Ladies & Gents
San Antonio, Texas March 13
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Austin Ukulele Society
Austin, Texas March 16
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Dallas Ukulele HQ
Dallas, Texas March 25
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Tulsa Ukulele Club
Tulsa, Oklahoma March 31
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Memphis Ukulele Group
Memphis, Tennessee April 2
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Huntsville Ukulele Group
Huntsville, Alabama April 5
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Nashville Ukulele Group
Nashville, Tennessee April 7
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Willis Music
Lexington, Kentucky April 9
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Arthur’s Music Store
Indianapolis, Indiana April 14
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Spring/Summer

Allegheny Uke Soriee
Altoona, PA April 20-22
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Ukulele Festival of Scotland
Drumfries, Scotland April 27-29
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West Coast Uke Retreat
Pacific Grove, CA May 2-6
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Kamloops Uke Fest
Sorrento, BC, Canada June 15-17
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Midwest Uke & Harmonica Camp
Olivet, Michigan June 22-24
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Elderly Instruments
Lansing, Michigan October 6
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The Circle #16:
Relative Minors

Posted on: December 11th, 2011 by dville

New 5th FinderThe-Circle WebWelcome to The Circle, our voyage into the mysteries of The Circle of 5ths. Today it’s all in the family as we introduce the Relative Minors.  

Finding a major key’s relative minor is as simple as counting up to that key’s sixth scale degree. Using our handy 5th finder we see that in the key of C Major the fifth is G so the sixth scale degree must be A.
A is the relative minor of C. So what does that mean? Well, if you start on A and play all C scale notes you will have played the A Natural Minor Scale (A-B-C-D-E-F-G-A). Play it on your instrument and listen to what it sounds like.
On the circle, the relative minors are depicted as lower case letters directly below their realtive majors. The relative minors also share the same key signature. For example, the Key of G has one sharp (F#) as does the Key of E minor.
Observation: Count up to the sixth scale degree of any major key and you’ve found that key’s relative minor. Play the major scale notes from the sixth and you’ll be playing in that key’s relative minor key.

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