Ukulele Workshops

Schedule | 2019

The Fret House
Covina, California March 15
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McCabe’s Music
Santa Monica, California March 16
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Sunbunker
Burbank, California March 17
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SFUSC & UOGB
Santa Fe, New Mexico March 24
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Illinois State Museum
Springfield, Illinois April 27
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New Mexico Uke Weekend
ABQ & Santa Fe, NM May 4-5
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Artichoke Coffeehouse
Portland, Oregon May 31
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Artichoke Music
Portland, Oregon June 1
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Tigard Ukulele Group
Tigard, Oregon June 2
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Shipley Center
Sequim, Washington June 3
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Jansen Art Center
Lynden, Washington June 6
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Dusty Strings
Seattle, Washington June 8
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SUPA Meeting
Seattle, Washington June 9
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Spokane Ukestra
Spokane, Washington June 11
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Kamloops Ukulele Festival
Sorrento, BC, Canada June 13-16
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Camp Oo Koo Lay Lay
Lake Berryessa, Calif. June 19-23
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Cuyahoga Valley Uke Retreat
Cuyahoga Valley Nat.Park, Ohio August 23-25
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Lyle Ritz’s Favorite Chord Shape Revealed!

Posted on: September 29th, 2009 by dville


In yesterday’s 3 Questions feature ukulele jazz master Lyle Ritz revealed his favorite chord shape. Today, I’ve posted an artist’s representation of that shape…the F9. A great way to start to understand these shapes is to number each note of the chord. The F9 chord contains the notes F-A-C-Eb-G (1-3-5-b7-9). Since there are only four strings on a ukulele and five notes to this chord, one note will have to be eliminated. Usually the doomed note is the first note in the chord, also called the root. In this case we will dispose of the F. That leaves us with the 3rd note of the chord (A) on the 4th string, the flat 7th (Eb) on the 3rd string, the 9th (G) on the 2nd string and the 5th (C) on the 1st string.

By knowing the scale degree of each note of the chord and what string it falls on, you are able to alter any of the notes to create different extended chords. For example, if you move the C on the 1st string up two frets you’ve created an F13 chord. Now might be a good time to take a brisk walk outside…with your uke.

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